Tuesday, June 2, 2009

New Videocast: Keane, Meat Festival, and Cleveland

In this new episode I address things like space, indie rock performances, and culinary decisions.

You may view this new episode here.






subscribe Subscribe to HetPer

subscribe Subscribe to Gendering the Media Podcast

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Keane, Indie Rock, Meat, and Cleveland.
Hmm!

Tina said...

Ièm still not able to play the videocasts on my iPhone or iPod.
Ièd best go that route as I rarely watch things off of my computer screen.
Any feedback on that....
thx

Tina said...

Ièm still not able to play the videocasts on my iPhone or iPod.
Ièd best go that route as I rarely watch things off of my computer screen.
Any feedback on that....
thx

JJ said...

Also, what I would love to submit at this point is why, you think, it is so unlikely for two seemingly different cultural texts to share the same space. There are, after all, plenty of rockers who do eat meat, or, for that reason, plenty of meat lovers who would opt for Enya over Keane.
Sorry, that last comment had to come out of me!
;)
How is the new place, btw....

Anonymous said...

I think that true creativity is best informed when it finds itself in unlikely, and even perhaps, uncomfortable settings.
But there is a correlation between music genres and lifestyles that is definitely a given.
I mean, when one says Woodstock, I do not necessarily think of Bree Hodge-like characters, if you catch my drift.
I dug. Thanks.

Will said...

Will, btw.

liam said...

what an odd thing to play at. ;)

David said...

Such is the case when two things that almost seem contradictory are found together, and the only thing I could think of that would be responsible would be corporate sponsoring (if you know otherwise, please tell!). There is a popular term among American youth these days, though the youth clearly didn't coin the term, known as "selling out," or as a noun "sellout." It is basically the accusation that one is no longer motivated by creativity or the pleasure of producing something but by money, which is always assumed to be followed by a significant decrease in the quality of work. I always find it very interesting when someones or somethings fan base takes a turn for the worse the minute they feel the artist or individual has shifted their focus from producing (whatever it is they may produce) to making money. The world is clouded with so many cliches and predispositions like "it's a dog-eat-dog world," but also "money is the root of all evil," that I often wonder how anyone can expect to be successful or take great strides in life without feeling they have compromised themselves or their values. The reality: quid pro quo has been a driving force for centuries, if not millennia, and I doubt that will change abruptly.

Is there such thing as a 'sellout' in academia?

Donna said...

I also find the concept of selling out quite interesting. In a nutshell, the moment someone has it made, s/he is a sellout. Granted, some measure of authenticty is sacrified when is interested in wider appeal, however, the bulk of one's art doesn't need to get fully eradicated.

Will said...

I have often raised the same concerns as David. Great progress is bound to come with a change of course, at times quite considerable.