Friday, May 15, 2009

New Videocast: Individual Skill and Destiny in the Middle Ages







In this new episode of De Amore: On Love with Brikena Ribaj I talk about the character of Gregorious in Hartmann von Aue's Gregorius der gute Sünder. The question I raise is how a medieval character's skill set manages to inform the overall individual destiny of said character.

You can view this short episode here.




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8 comments:

Dana said...

How valid a point is it to compare the protestant notion of the importance of individual 'works'?

Will said...

The fact that there is focus on the importance of personal agency speaks of something gripping here. A synthesis of destiny and private works is, after all, not only empirically sound but also 'emotionally.'

Jamen said...

Ha. Is that Brunhild portrayed in the photo?
Are there are medieval works where the focus on individual works is comparably visible?
How about the earlier French narative La vie du st. Gregoire?

Nicki said...

I said 'there's nothing under the sun' the other day.
And I meant it.
Case in point here....

Nicki said...

But I do wonder about your take on the importance of individual works. Are you not running the risk of sounding a tad too modern here.
Your take does feel a bit too modern to me, I have to say.
Or, could I be missing something here?

Becca said...

But is Hartmann's treatment of personal progress principally work-oriented?

Candace said...

Gregorius the man seems to be a natural extension of Gregorius the future leader of the Catholic Church.
I think that Hartmann is mostly interested in depicting the humanity of the office.

Nicki said...

By the way, I meant to bring this up sooner.
My iPhone and iPod can't lay the videocast. The iTunes says that it doesn't support the media. How can I play them on my gadgets. I can always see them online or on iTunes but I'd rather carry them with....
Advice?