Friday, January 23, 2009

New Podcast: Wim Wenders' Far Away, So Close


The new podcast is now available on iTunes under Gendering the Media with Brikena Ribaj as well as in here.
This piece was first conceptualized a while back while under the active influence of the philosophical movement of existentialism. I have always been a fan of Wim Wenders' cinematography because I always felt a sense of affinity with his work and his implementation of existentialism. The text of this podcast is also my first published co-authored article. I find this to be an oldie but a goodie, for the most part.
The cinematic text I'm reading closely is the 1993 German film In Weiter Ferne, so nah!, i.e., Far Away, So Close!.
It's another contribution to modernity, I suppose.
You can listen to the piece here.


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graph per imdb

27 comments:

Dana said...

Listening to it now. Existentialism usually gets clumped with notions of sadness and negativity. At the core of it, though, lie basic existence questions. I like the new pic of you podcast-ing.

JJ said...

Cassiel is such a beautifully sad and misunderstood character. Far Away So Close!., is such a good film. thx.
I like the sense of the 'hypermodern' that the picture conveys, by the way. Very podcast age, very cool. :-)

Becca said...

The analysis of time and the concept of human beings being in a state of 'im Werden' is what I particularly enjoyed. The idea that we are the cumulative of our experiences up to the designated point in time in the present is another one that caused me to pause.
Here's what I'll say about your podcast series "Gendering the Media with Brikena Ribaj." They're not the easiest to decode but they are so worth it!
thanks, BR!!

Becca said...

And, yes, the picture is so unequivocally you.

Becca said...

pps.
I have to say that the following line made my day.
"This piece was first conceptualized a while back while under the active influence of the philosophical movement of existentialism."
Under what influence is one to come up with such 'influential' lines, pray tell?

Dave said...

I loved Wings of Desire and I look forward to another look at Far Away. Thanks for this....

Deidre said...

I noticed that in this piece there is a heavier emphasis on character reading. Wenders is a multilayered filmmaker. A great two-piece, Berlin and Far Away...

Tina said...

I have been thinking about Wim Wenders and this comes at a good time. :)
I like the podcast pic!

Marie J. said...

Ah, YES! Lou Reed is in this one.
I love that track:
"Why Can't I Be Good...?"
Perhaps I have not adequately expressed how much the podcasts are appreciated but they are!
Thank you!
I'll view In Weiter Ferne, so nah! again.

Marie J. said...

And I do think the point in time in which Lou Reed talks to Cassiel as he has reached a low point is a turning point in the story.
And, btw, that was my rediscovery of the uber-cool Lour Reed!

Jenny said...

It started my Saturday, the new podcast.
I have a question about your inclusion of a discussion of Time. I see that it relates to the Emit Flesti character but looking at it as a 'human construct,' in a way, precludes E-M-I-T, no?

Jamie said...

I agree about the Lou Reed reference. There is def. much about the rebellious and the nonconforming in Cassiel, much like L. Reed. Can't think that's a mere coincidence. It's a Wenders film, after all.

The picture.
Yes, good angle. Whoever took it, gets photography and the subject it captures.

Thanks for the new podcast. Last week was missed.

Nicki said...

Would you say that Cassiel's inability to adapt to humanity is because he can't balance general goodness with imperfect mortality or because his conceptualization of goodness is totally different.
His assuming human shape seems to happen out of circumstantial need: he becomes human because he has to save, Raissa, the little girl. Whereas Damiel, became human because he chose and wanted to: out of human love for Marion.
How I love both of these films!
I like the new blog picture, too. It's an apropos translation.

Nicki said...

I also appreciated the fact that you included EMIT's characterization of Cassiel. When he refers to Cassiel as an irregular or a misfit..., that proves the premise of this piece, I though.

john said...

this came across as more the phil. of existentialism than the literary application of existent.

B.R. said...

-Right. This piece is more philosophy-inspired and less literary theory-oriented. It's sort of a rite of passage, if you will.

-Thank you, all for the comments re: the picture. It was taken a couple of days ago as I was recording this very podcast. So, it's very now, very a-la-podcast and modernity culture. I like a lot, as well. It captures it all very well. And the artist is someone uber-cool and artistically informed which adds much to the piece as well.
Thanks.

Scott S. said...

I'll comment more on the podcast when I'm done with it but whoever took the new podcast-recording picture, 'good on ya!'

Rob said...

I really enjoy these. And I'm getting spoiled. I need to re-view In Weiter, though. Thanks for the stimulation.

-Rob

Diane said...

I agree with the others'. Wim Wenders is a fantastically unique filmmaker.
I also approve of the pic. :)

Diane said...

I actually did have a specific question. When TIME FLESTI says 'time is the absence of money.' what is he referring to. I know the setting is a small business as in the case of Damiel's pizzeria but he can't be talking about pizza.....
Any feedback?

Becca said...

Oh, also. Cool pic, Dr. B.R.

Tina said...

I haven't intimated this before but what I needed to mention on the other pieces as well is the fact that I also appreciate the delivery of the pieces. The reading of the pieces as much a part of the process as the writing of the pieces and that deserves to be acknowledged as well. So, thanks. The voice adds such an important aspect to the whole text you're discussing.
'Per me', of course.
Ergo, in the words of the Romans, 'gratias tibi ago.'
The capturer of the photo 'captured' a good a relevant moment, I concur. :) I like it, 2!

Dana said...

Any word on the text of clothing here?

HDC said...

I thought you would perhaps gender Raphaela for some reason, so this was a surprise. But then you tend to do that, diversify, that is.
I like the picture. I'm sure the micro nature of it is to create with a subject, I postulate.... ;)
Couldn't resist....

Anonymous said...

Same question:
Why not much attention on Raphaela?

B.R. said...

-The reason why Raphaela does not take the driver's seat in this piece is because the premise of this project is different. We set out to do an Existentialism-informed analysis of the film.

Sra said...

I watched Far Away So Close last weekend and just got to this podcast today. I hadn't realized that Emit Flesti was Time Itself, but that is illuminating to know. I enjoyed the film. It's very existential indeed. Very contemplative on time, existence, and the human condition. Cool.