Friday, January 2, 2009

New Podcast: Literary/Cinematic Analysis, Part I



The new podcast is Part One of a two-part literary analysis. In this piece I compare and contrast the Swiss novel Homo Faber and its cinematic adaptation, Voyager. In this analysis I explore the relationships and relations between the key characters.
To listen to the new piece, click here.




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12 comments:

David G. said...

Heady, but that's not what my comment is about.
I will watch this movie. I like Sam Shepard and Schloendorff is a heck of a director.
You know, the more analyses I 'hear' the clearer some of this literary stuff gets.....
thks.

JJ said...

Homo Faber is a great German novel! Thanks.
Is the use of the Oedipus Complex captured well enough in the film?

dan said...

I liked the opening. The Black Book article you quote is from a 2004 issue, right? As always, thx!!

Sra said...

This is one of the novels I was supposed to read in Kiel several years ago, but, well, I had so many things to read, and something had to get the axe. I do remember seeing the film, though. Thought it was weird back then, but that was before I began to appreciate films like Dancer in the Dark and Punch Drunk Love.

So I guess it's time to revisit.

I did see Eyes Wide Shut as a result of your podcasts, by the way, and I was pleasantly surprised to find that I loved it! Now I have to revisit that podcast.

sean said...

Voyager is a heavy film. I have not read Homo Faber yet but just added it to the list.
There's a genuine 'indie' feel to this film.

Anonymous said...

It needs a couple of listens. I also liked the intro. thanks.

tina said...

i've noticed something here. both this and the Eyes Wide Shut piece had such distinct historical layers. Europe pre- and post-Berlin Wall and the pre-2000 West. It's tough to create a big comprehensive socio-historical framework. Somehow you manage to do so.
thanks, bri!

Brooke said...

It's a tough piece but it's definitely followable. Thanks for the exercise!

Brooke said...

Btw, did you catch Milk?

Will said...

Bri,
Just a note to thank you for the podcasts. One of the great things about Web 2.0 is that it facilitates education. What a great thing technology. And what a wonderful thing to get literary context for some of these wonderful literary pieces.

Darren said...

Which translation of Homo Faber do you recommend?

Jodi said...

I'm going to read Homo Faber. Thanks for these. The analysis helps with pre-reading, too.