Monday, December 29, 2008

New Podcast: Finale of Fiction Narrative


This is Part Three of the three-part podcast we started a few weeks ago. In this project, I am using fiction as a way of making sense of and decoding literary theory. The text of fiction you are about to hear is heavily laced with gender theory references. The gender ambiguity of the characters was informed by Dante's "Canto V" of the Inferno (Divine Comedy) and its two most important characters: Paolo and Francesca.
Click here to listen to the podcast. Also, the new podcast is available on iTunes under Gendering the Media with Brikena Ribaj.




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20 comments:

Tina said...

I really enjoyed the conclusion. Using the 'textile' as a text in and of itself added much to the narrative. thks.

Brooke said...

Other good quotes in here. Liked the ending. 'and there ended my authenticity.'
Thanks for making your podcasts available on iTunes as well. That way I can put them on my iPod.
By the way, who is in the photo and why are including it here?

Sean said...

I think I got it. Gender and identity are obviously related but what I liked about this piece is that identity has many forms and shapes as context dictates.

JJ said...

Is the picture a play on Francesca?

JJ said...

I really liked the bit authenticity at the end as well. Good piece! How long did it take you to write this and why resort to fiction to 'decode' theory. You tend to be quite comfortable with theory anyway....

Dana said...

Wow. A lot of gender 'confusions' here but they did not feel affected. For some reasons, the 'gender confusions' came across as natural. That's the thing, in real life gender and gendered identities are at times hard to detect. And that's a good thing. They're so natural that they're inconspicuous. Is that the point you were going for?

Maria said...

degendering the subject can be tough to do but it was done here. much of a 'character's' identity seems to be attached to gender and leaving gender out in a way frees the character.

dave said...

The conclusion did it for me. It brought more meaning to exposition.

Anonymous said...

and is that Stella McCartney?

Candace said...

This is a heavy piece. It has many layers but I do find it easier to understand than the straight-up literary analyses. thanks much.

Deidre said...

Got it on iTunes. thx!!

Sra said...

Cool. I want more stories!

I liked the "Give us this day our daily smile" bit. That's something Ian and I like to throw around in our speech too, so it made me smile.

Jenny said...

This really did it for me too. SO many great one-liners. That Hermes. What a trip! Where did you inform that characters? Or rather, how?

Deidre said...

My favorite character was the desubjectified 'I'. Good piece!!

tina said...

I really liked this. I could actually 'see' the narrative. thx.

Alex said...

The three pieces are well-woven together. I have the same question. How was this conceptualized and why Dante's Canto V?

Nicki said...

It's not dumbed down and that's the first thing I like. Even though there are a lot of literary references in this piece they make sense somehow in the bigger narrative scheme. I liked the comment on authenticity at the very end. Sometimes we sacrifice authenticity to be kind. I certainly do that time and time again.

Anonymous said...

I dug the conclusion too.

Deidre said...

Why Stella McCartney, btw?

Doug said...

Thanks, Bri!