Friday, December 12, 2008

New Podcast: Fiction Explaining Theory


This is Part One of a three-part podcast. In this project, I am using fiction as a way of making sense of and decoding theory. The text of fiction you are about to hear is heavily laced with gender theory references. The gender ambiguity of the characters was informed by Dante's Canto V of the Inferno (Divine Comedy) and its two most important characters: Paolo and Francesca.

I wrote this piece of fiction which I originally entitled 'The Third' when under the strong influence of Dante's Inferno V. This piece is about 10 minutes long. As always, feedback and reactions are welcome.

Also, this new podcast will be available on iTunes circa 5:00 PM today. And, as intimated earlier, a new podcast will be available in iTunes every Friday evening.

Listen to the piece here.





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28 comments:

JJ said...

Is that Lou Dillon?
I like that this is shorter but I also wanted to hear more. Look forward to the next part.

'Pick one item at a time...' I suppose, this sentence will always mean more. I like how basic fiction contains so many literary references.
'I'd liek to have access to sight should I run into things worth seeing.'
I like!

JJ said...

Oh, my very favorite would have to me:
"Alas, I'm normal."
Good use of 'alas.' :)

B.R. said...

Yes, it's Lou Dillon, sister of Charlotte Gainsbourg. I find her style to be almost purposefully in that middle 'third.'
This is how she describes her style credo:
'What attracts me is something broken, something a bit off. I never comb my hair or make anything pretty. When people look too beautiful, it's too easy. I know I'm dressed wrong if the businessman turns his head. But I like to think that after an hour of sitting next to me on the train, he'd look. I'd have grown on him.'

Tina said...

I liked the bit about the thin soup-drinking man.
Might I ask what informed that choice of character?
Thks again.

Carrie said...

Is the use of the fictional "I" a tip of the hat to Dante's dual use of "I", i.e., Dante, the pilgrim and Dante, the poet?

JJ said...

And I really like the top banner. I always thought you were a fan of Green, however. Is there a contextual reason why you're preferring Red and Grey?
HetPer informs, so thks.

Deidre said...

I like the idea of using fiction to actually 'explain' theory.
I agree with some of the previous comments on the other podcasts.
These are dense and not so easy to 'get' on a first try, but I appreciate them. Thanks for reaching and teaching the wider audience this way. We all read better if we become more intimate with literary jargon.
At least, I think so.
Why Hermes, by the way?

John said...

I look forward to how the narrative concludes. I have often thought about the fundamental truths that are found in the quotidian.

Dan said...

I've also often found that no other source can help clarify theory the way fiction can which is, in and of itself pretty ironic, as theory supposedly exists to shed light on fiction.
Hm. Curious thing.

Dan said...

And good choice for a photo. Lou Dillon is so post-categories. I like too.

Nicki said...

"... and entering his closet is almost like a religious experience.'
I loved this. "Temple of couture" ... I will use this.

Nicki said...

"... and entering his closet is almost like a religious experience.'
I loved this. "Temple of couture" ... I will use this.

Nicki said...

Another favorite bit:

"Hermes is a tad narcissistic. That seems to be the core of is problems. Per her."

Nothing like fiction to make dense theory bearable.
Per me, at least.

Nicki said...

Another favorite bit:

"Hermes is a tad narcissistic. That seems to be the core of is problems. Per her."

Nothing like fiction to make dense theory bearable.
Per me, at least.

Gina said...

Baseball hats and pointy shoes....?

YES!

This podcast is easier to 'get' than the others. I like, I like. I appreciate them all but I especially liked the one I could 'decode' faster. That perhaps says more about me, though, yes? :)

Gina said...

Baseball hats and pointy shoes....?

YES!

This podcast is easier to 'get' than the others. I like, I like. I appreciate them all but I especially liked the one I could 'decode' faster. That perhaps says more about me, though, yes? :)

Gina said...

Baseball hats and pointy shoes....?

YES!

This podcast is easier to 'get' than the others. I like, I like. I appreciate them all but I especially liked the one I could 'decode' faster. That perhaps says more about me, though, yes? :)

Gina said...

And sorry for the repeats. Was using Safari today.

Carrie said...

iTunes, by the way, does not have it today. It says hetper 002 but this should be hetper 003. I thought I'd let you know. Have a good wkd and thanks for these.

Eric L said...

"I don't have to waste much therapy for therapy. He goes for the both of us."
This statement resonated with me. Good piece!
Made me think of postcolonial theory, actually....

Eric L said...

Oh, also, "We thank thee for the gift of quirks and those who love them."
This so will be used. :)

Brooke said...

It reads or at least 'hears' pretty a-la-Rilke.
I liked the third gender thing generated out of the whole Paolo/Francesca duo.

Jenny said...

What I like about narratives like this is that they are not as intimidating to 'decode', you know?
thx.
My favorite bit was also the baseball cap and pointy show comment.
Brill!

Jamie said...

Am I too far off to think that I thought of both Roquetin and Malte Laurids Brigge on 'gender theory' steroids?

Jamie said...

...to think of a connection between Sartre and Rilke, I mean.
My previous syntax was a bit out of whack, I realize.

HDC said...

This is a good one. The gender theory on steroids bit. Triple ha!!!

Sra said...

I had an easier time with this one, too. It's more visual than some of the others. I really liked it.

The dancing part reminded me of an incident I had with an exboyfriend when we were sitting on the train, and I put my arm around him. He got noticeably uncomfortable, and I asked him what was up.

He said, "You're putting your arm around me. I'm supposed to put my arm around you."

"But you didn't put your arm around me," I said. But I acquiesced and removed my arm, and he dutifully placed his around me instead. Should have taken that as a sign it wouldn't work.

Brooke said...

I agree, this was easier to get. It's amazing how little daily bits can shed so much light.