Tuesday, August 26, 2008

Music and Maturity

"For most of us, our love of music isn't getting in the way of work, family and relationships. At least I hope not. I'm not a therapist. I don't know what to tell you if you keep breaking up with people because they've never heard of Os Mutantes or Scott Walker. Nor do I have advice for you if your marriage is on the rocks because you'd rather see The Hold Steady than have dinner with the in-laws."

Music, as Nietzsche's music-loving, dying Socrates maintained, is the ultimate language and, as such, it is bound to evoke stark feelings. And maybe Socrates would have also skipped a dinner with the in-laws if The Hold Steady were performing on the Forum. One can only guess at this point.

(post scriptum: I found it interesting that Socratic references were also used in two previous posts on music: one on Bob Dylan and the other on Stereophonics.)

Good post. Read it all here.

5 comments:

Ani said...

I can say with absolute sincerity that some of the best misunderstandings I've had with my signif. other have revolved around me going to my concerts, well, at least wanting to go to concerts....

Ani said...

I can say with absolute sincerity that some of the best misunderstandings I've had with my signif. other have revolved around me going to my concerts, well, at least wanting to go to concerts....

Tina said...

In my case, music allows me to work. Here's sth obnoxiously true about me: i called in sick one day when my iPod wasn't on me.....

James W said...

Nothing wrong with being reverted back to adolescence on account of music. I'm in my 30's and very much a fan of what I used to like when I was 15.

Juergen said...

But then other kinds of music make some of us, myself included, look/come across 'old' and oh-so-'80's.